VOICE In Ione 2013 ©


MULE CREEK STATE PRISON EXPANSION

VOICE IN IONE EXCLUSIVE

 

SHOULD THE CITY OF IONE HOLD A SPECIAL ELECTION AND ASK RESIDENTS WHETHER OR NOT THEY SUPPORT THE MULE CREEK STATE PRISON EXPANSION?

 

IONE CITY COUNCIL BEGINS A DISCUSSION OF THE ISSUE DURING THE APRIL 16th CITY COUNCIL MEETING. 

 

City Councilman Dale Haney: “I feel that if there was a vote, the nays would outweigh the yeas significantly, largely.” 

 

Councilman Ron Smylie: “How much would an election cost?” 

 

Ms. Bette Rhodes letter to the Ione City Council April 5th, 2013: There are 2,286 (as of Feb 10, 2013 per elections office) registered tax paying voters in Ione. Each and every one of these people should be allowed to vote yea or nay on another prison proposal that directly effects the people that live here. In 1994 Mule Creek State Prison (MCSP) wanted to build a second prison. We had an advisory committee that did months of research on the impact that would be put on lone and its resources if a second facility came to be.  

 

1) Increased traffic   (1,000-1,600 cars daily on the bridge, and up Preston Ave and Shakely Lane) No road improvements since MCSP was built in 1986.

2) Increase in police calls   Either from the prison, bringing drugs into prison, domestic violence, etc.

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3) Increase in Ione Fire Department calls

4) Increase of usage of water, which over burdens our waste water treatment system. 

5) Increase in solid waste at land fill   (1991) 3,673 tons to 4,585 tons (1993).

6) Court system back-up   (Rural counties are rated worst for back-ups).

7) Increase impact on schools   (The dollars mitigated are not necessarily spent in lone, as we have already seen).

 

“In 1994, we were allowed to vote if a second prison would be a positive change for Ione, and it was voted down.” 

 

04.20.13

MULE CREEK STATE PRISON EXPANSION

MULE CREEK STATE PRISON NEWS  CITY COUNCIL SUPPORTS LETTER TO STATE CORRECTIONS - But won’t put proposed project in the hands of voters

 

“The City of Ione recognizes the importance of this project

to the State and is willing to support the infill expansion project” 

 

The lack of construction reflects a dearth of public support for prison spending, as well as recession-era budget constraints. "Look, everybody wants to send people to prison. Nobody wants to pay for it," Brown said in January, when he declared at a news conference that California had solved its prison crowding problem.

 

The governor said limited resources are better spent on education and rehabilitation, and there is "enough money in the criminal justice system."

 

 

The prospect for funding construction of new prisons in the current Legislature is dim. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, said last week that it would be "a public policy mistake for us to spend more money on building more jail beds as opposed to more mental health services or mental health beds outside the prisons."

MULE CREEK STATE PRISON EXPANSION

MULE CREEK - PLANS UNDERWAY FOR A MULTI- MILLION DOLLAR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENT

 

Mule Creek State Prison was advertising in Friday’s Ledger Dispatch for “Construction Management Services” for a “Major Capital Outlay Project at Mule Creek State Prison.”  The project involves upgrades to the existing Mule Creek State Prison wastewater treatment facility and is estimated at $5 million in construction costs.

 

What makes this news surprising is that Mule Creek recently contributed $25,000 towards a $150,000 Regional Wastewater Study being completed by Ione’s Wastewater Czar GHD, and under the supervision of ARSA. ARSA and Ione also contributed $25,000 each, along with a $75,000 grant from the State. If Mule Creek is going forward with a          $5 Million dollar improvement project it appears that they may no longer be interested in pursuing a Regional Wastewater solution with Ione.

 

Ione characterized their wastewater system as “a regional system benefitting itself, ARSA and Mule Creek State Prison … Both ARSA  and Mule Creek are reliant upon the City's disposal system to execute their long-term plans, including proposed expansion of service at Mule Creek State Prison” in their application for $3.25 Million dollars in loans from I-Bank.

 

Developing Story . . . 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS NEWS

STATE PRISON EXPANSION

 

CHINO MAYOR DENNIS YATES AND CHINO HILLS MAYOR PETER ROGERS EXPRESSED STRONG OBJECTION TO THE

CONSTRUCTION OF NEW FACILITIES AT THE CHINO PRISON.

 

Recent anger from local officials over the possibility that the number of beds at the California Institution for Men could be increased appears to be a bit premature.

 

While the Chino prison could add more beds in the near future, prisons in San Diego and Ione are more likely candidates, a state prisons spokesman said. As part of ongoing efforts to improve conditions at California's prisons and to reduce costs, the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation recently said it plans to build a new Level II facility at five possible locations in the state, one of them being CIM.

 

But even the slight possibility of an expansion at CIM is not being taken lightly by locals. At a Chino City Council meeting earlier this month, Yates said he planned to fight prison officials if there was an expansion of CIM.

 

"Adding to the current prison population would have significant social and economic effects on the community" Yates said.

 

Click Here To Read The Entire Inland Valley Daily Bulletin Story . . .

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS NEWS

WHY CALIFORNIA WON'T BUILD PRISONS TO EASE INMATE OVERCROWDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click Here To Read The Entire Sacramento Bee Story . . .

The lack of construction reflects a dearth of public support for prison spending, as well as recession-era budget constraints. "Look, everybody wants to send people to prison. Nobody wants to pay for it," Brown said in January, when he declared at a news conference that California had solved its prison crowding problem.

 

The governor said limited resources are better spent on education and rehabilitation, and there is "enough money in the criminal justice system."

 

The prospect for funding construction of new prisons in the current Legislature is dim. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, said last week that it would be "a public policy mistake for us to spend more money on building more jail beds as opposed to more mental health services or mental health beds outside the prisons."

02.04.13

02.04.13

06.14.13

07.14.13

07.14.13

MULE CREEK STATE PRISON EXPANSION

VOICE IN IONE EXCLUSIVE

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The California Department Of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Has Released Its Draft Environmental Impact Report for the Level II Infill Correctional Facilities Project 

 

The newly released 923 page document outlines the anticipated impacts for Ione caused by the construction of a new 1,594 bed low-security inmate facility next to the current Level 4 facility. 

 

Of the 2,376 new beds CDCR plans to create, Ione would house over 65% of this proposed increase. 

 

Ione is one of five possible sites for this ambitious project. 

 

Click On Any Report To Open

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Please be patient while downloading.  These reports are large.)

07.10.13